Medisend College Receives a $60k Grant from Hillcrest Foundation

The grant is in support of the General Richard B. Myers Veterans Program – Associate of Applied Science in Biomedical Engineering Technology.

The Hillcrest Foundation has awarded a $60k grant to Medisend College to help provide professional training and job placement for veterans in the General Richard B. Myers Veterans Program.

“We are proud to partner with the General Myers Veterans Program at Medisend College to help advance secure financial futures for veterans and their families,” says Debra Goldstein Phares, SVP, Philanthropic Client Director at Bank of America Private Bank, on behalf of the Hillcrest Foundation.

Medisend College, under the General Myers Veterans Program, provides veterans the education and training necessary to become professional field engineers and biomedical technicians in an increasingly demanding healthcare industry. The Program has a proven track record of assisting veterans to successfully return to civilian life and providing a rapid pathway to well-paying jobs and lifelong careers with healthcare industry leaders such as Siemens, GE Healthcare, Henry Schein Dental, and Beckman Coulter.

“It is through the generosity and commitment of donors such as Hillcrest Foundation that the Richard B. Myers Veterans Program at Medisend College is able to help veterans enter the civilian workforce as well-trained, well-paid professionals,” says General Myers, Chairman, Board of Trustees of Medisend College, “We take pride knowing that the Program benefits veterans and their families, the healthcare institutions where they work, and the patients that they serve.”

Biomedical Equipment Technology and Medical Device: Downsizing

Downsizing is more than a trend these days; it’s actually a Hollywood film featuring Matt Damon.  Technology has always become more compact.  Computers, hard drives, mobile phones, cameras, and portable media storage have all gotten smaller.  The medical field is no stranger to this trend.  Almost 5 decades ago, diabetic patients carried a large back-pack size insulin pump. Through modernization, this device can do the same thing as a cell-phone sized device or implant under the skin today!

Medisend pioneered the first and largest comprehensive mobile biomedical equipment test and repair lab for BMETs, placing over 4000 pieces of critical supplies, spare parts and equipment in one transportable repair lab.  Our kits have been deployed around the world to more than 23 countries around the world, including Angola, Nigeria, Equatorial Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Haiti, Colombia and Papua New Guinea. It remains the largest mobile repair lab of its kind in the world. Place the link to the Kit page on the website

We sent a Lab/Kit to Dikembe Mutombo’s hospital in Congo. There was a wonderful story about a specialist children’s heart surgeon traveling to Mutombo’s hospital for an open heart operation on a small child. One of the critical pieces of equipment required for the surgery broke down as the doctor was underway. They wanted to cancel the operation and the doctor’s trip, but our team got on the phone with two of our Medisend College trained technicians, and with the test and repair equipment that was in their labs, together the two teams resolved the problem and repaired the piece of equipment. In the end, the doctor flew to the Biamba Marie Mutombo Hospital (Dikembe’s mother), and operated on the child and saved her life.

My Experience Being a Student at Medisend College

My Name is Damon Fletcher, I am a veteran who recently graduated from Medisend College of Biomedical Engineering Technology. I faced several obstacles even before I was enrolled in school. I suffered a significant injury that prevented me from continuing my military service. I was faced with trying to figure out exactly what I was going to do next because I really didn’t have a contingency plan in place at the time. I searched several resources for good veterans’ job training programs, only to find very few that would translate into a job after the training. I found the General Richard B Myers Program offered at Medisend College and contacted the school. The first person I talked to was Nick Hallack to get more information pertaining to the school and its curriculum. I was surprised to find out the school was very similar to the BMET program that the military personnel is trained for. The whole staff at Medisend was very helpful throughout the entire application process. The moment I arrived they made me feel at home and addressed whatever needs I might have so I could achieve success in the program. It was such a family atmosphere that it became infectious to the students as well.

As a veteran, there are different challenges you face versus a traditional student. Some of us have been on deployments or been in traumatic situations so we may require additional resources to cope with certain situations and stress. Medisend made sure we always had access to those appropriate resources if they were needed. If you had any personal issues the instructors or administration would never turn you away and were eager to assist you. The instructors went above and beyond to make sure you understood the material and encouraged you to ask questions. They really helped you gain confidence, which is vital for some veterans because it’s harder to transition back into civilian life if you served any length of time. I recently received a job offer from Siemens as a Field Service Engineer in San Francisco, and it is only because I enrolled in this program. The curriculum aligns with the current industry standards which enabled me to get a job with a higher starting salary. It also is a program that can be done in six months and allow the veteran to not incur debt in order to finish. Coming to Medisend College has changed my life and set me on course for a good sustainable career. There are several programs that boast about putting veterans back to work, but this program really yields results. This program had a profound effect on my life, and I believe more veterans should have the opportunity to attend.

“Medisend College Significantly Helped with My Job Offer from Henry Schein”: Tyson Jelink’s BMET Success Story

TysonThe military transitioning period can be difficult, but if you are like Tyson Jelinek, Marine Corps, you can think smart and use what you learned from the military to your advantage. “Transitioning out of the Marine Corps, I wasn’t quite sure what my next move should be.” Jelinek says. Just like most, it is not easy.

“I knew that I wanted to work on things and somehow help people by doing so.” The demand for this skill is immense, especially in the biomedical engineering technology/healthcare industry.

Upon doing his research, Jelinek came across Medisend College of Biomedical Engineering Technology, he believed in his skills and the demand for it. “It would be a great choice since I wanted to start work as soon as possible while earning an accelerated degree.”

Tyson earns his Biomedical Equipment Technology Certificate and an Associate of Applied Science in Biomedical Engineering Technology.  “My overall experience was positive, and the instructors and staff cared about each student and their progress. The skills I acquired while attending Medisend College significantly helped with my job offer from Henry Schein. If I could do it over again I would in a heartbeat. Huge thank you to the staff and instructors at Medisend for serving those who served, and making the transition as smooth as possible into a promising career field.”

Tyson Jelinek is now employed with one of the top healthcare industry leaders, Henry Schein as a Biomedical Field Technician.

Biomedical Equipment Technology and Medical Device: Downsizing

Downsizing is more than a trend these days; it’s actually a Hollywood film featuring Matt Damon. Hollywood got the memo that technology will always become more compact gradually over time. Computers, hard drives, mobile phones, cameras, and portable media storage have all gotten smaller. The medical field is no stranger to this trend. Almost 5 decades ago, diabetic patients carried a large back-pack size insulin pump. Through modernization and an invention by Dean Kamen, a miniature device can now do the same thing as a cell-phone sized device or implant under the skin today.

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